19 responses

  1. L.A. Pontes
    January 17, 2020

    Fantastic story! One formidable written this one. Congrats

    Reply

  2. Claire Lawrence
    January 19, 2020

    The line “I want to cut a hole in the air and climb inside is phenomenal.” I can’t stop thinking about it.

    Reply

  3. Jan Priddy
    January 20, 2020

    Thank you.

    I think there are moments in full-time mothering when every woman feels as if she floats outside her own life, that life is not hers, that she needs a way to cut herself free of chains holding her back. From what exactly? I wonder how, as a species, we have survived this?

    Reply

  4. Shannon Tsonis
    January 20, 2020

    Oh my. You’ve captured the sentiment beautifully. Life moving on without me, or me missing out on something, has been a life long fear.

    Reply

  5. Anna
    January 21, 2020

    Your ghost is well and precisely described, Maggie. You remind me of a day shortly after I had announced I would leave, but before I left, when someone in the family called us all outside to see a spectacular sky. We had often referred to our family unity as “fourness,” and when the four of us stood out on the grass admiring the sky, yards apart but still bound invisibly as four, I knew that our fourness was already past.

    Reply

  6. Joanne
    January 21, 2020

    Love this, all of it, and especially your line about cutting a hole in the open air and crawling inside, and the extended metaphor. So often sympathy and compassion re: mourning are reserved only for widows and widowers; losses that accompany divorce are barely acknowledged. Thanks for this beautifully written piece that shows how haunting divorce is and how yes, it can make one feel like a ghost.

    Reply

  7. Lin
    January 21, 2020

    You say in a few words what has taken me over ten years to begin to reconcile. My ex started dating my good friend and then I lost her too. Grief from divorce was, and sometimes still is, awful. I,too, love the image of cutting a hole in the open air and crawling inside. I vacilated between homocidal and suicidal feelings for many months. There is loss, but the person is still alive, hence the ghost idea. Very well done.

    Reply

  8. Casey Mulligan Walsh
    January 21, 2020

    Searing is right. You so perfectly capture that feeling, of watching as if from outside and above, of being a spectator in your own life. Of at once invisibility and captivity. It resonates in so many ways for me, with multiple scenes that connect me to this world you draw us into. Thank you for writing this and sharing it with us.

    Reply

  9. Sejal Shah
    January 21, 2020

    This: “What I don’t say is when I lost my family, I lost someone, too. The person I’d called my person. In this way, my house is haunted.” I felt this, the ache, the haunting, being between lives. Just devastating and also perfectly rendered.

    Reply

  10. Emmy Wells
    January 22, 2020

    Lovely writing.

    Reply

  11. Amelia
    January 26, 2020

    Piercing words. I’m astounded by your ability to so eloquently portray the effects of divorce and the feelings that accompany the grief. Thank you for sharing. I’m so sorry for your and your children’s losses.

    Reply

  12. Joanne Nelson
    January 29, 2020

    Love this. It will haunt me for days. Also love the poem in The New Yorker this week. Congrats!

    Reply

  13. Catherine Stratton
    February 12, 2020

    Loved this. Thank you. It reminded me of my own divorce — my own loss.

    Reply

  14. Sunhong Hwang
    February 24, 2020

    Thank you for sharing your personal story.

    Reply

  15. Ryne S
    March 27, 2020

    The lyricism of this piece is haunting me. (Yes, I know that’s a punny phrase given the content, but it was still the most apt one.)

    Reply

  16. Judith Huizenga
    April 14, 2020

    This personal essay captures the loss of the family and her husband that follows a searing divorce. The feelingis described perfectly I loved the comment by the author’s son. The ghost story, Glitch, extends the metaphor to people who return from the dead and see that life goes on without them. Would directly using the metaphor, a ghost who sees live go on without them, been more effective if it was said directly without using Australian serial. This is a question, not a criticism

    Judy H

    Reply

  17. Kennedy
    April 29, 2020

    This was so good. I relate to this on a very personal level but from the perspective of a child of divorce. I remembered feeling that although I hadn’t lost a family member, I had lost a family. We were no longer the family unit. I struggled for a long time with the unfairness of it all. I didn’t choose the brokenness, but I had still been broken. I mourn for and with you in this. Thank you for sharing.

    Reply

  18. Eileen Vorbach Collins
    May 4, 2020

    Beautifully written and heartbreaking. “But I don’t have a family” brings memories of my own young son those many years ago.

    Reply

  19. TheTruthBehind
    January 16, 2021

    Thank you for sharing a beautiful ghost story.
    I really liked it
    keep sharing

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Back to top
mobile desktop